skiboot-5.7

skiboot v5.7 was released on Tuesday July 25th 2017. It follows two release candidates of skiboot 5.7, and is now the new stable release of skiboot following the 5.6 release, first released 24th May 2017.

skiboot v5.7 contains all bug fixes as of skiboot-5.4.6 and skiboot-5.1.19 (the currently maintained stable releases). We do not currently expect to do any 5.6.x stable releases.

For how the skiboot stable releases work, see Skiboot stable tree rules and releases for details.

POWER9 is still in development, and thus all POWER9 users must upgrade to skiboot v5.7.

This is the second release using the new regular six week release cycle, similar to op-build, but slightly offset to allow for a short stabilisation period. Expected release dates and contents are tracked using GitHub milestone and issues: https://github.com/open-power/skiboot/milestones

New Features

Since skiboot-5.6.0, we have a few new features:

New features in this release for POWER9 systems:

New feature for IBM FSP based systems:

  • fsp/tpo: Provide support for disabling TPO alarm

    This patch adds support for disabling a preconfigured Timed-Power-On(TPO) alarm on FSP based systems. Presently once a TPO alarm is configured from the kernel it will be triggered even if its subsequently disabled.

    With this patch a TPO alarm can be disabled by passing y_m_d==hr_min==0 to fsp_opal_tpo_write(). A branch is added to the function to handle this case by sending FSP_CMD_TPO_DISABLE message to the FSP instead of usual FSP_CMD_TPO_WRITE message. The kernel is expected to call opal_tpo_write() with y_m_d==hr_min==0 to request opal to disable TPO alarm.

POWER9

There are many important changes for POWER9 DD1 and DD2 systems. POWER9 support should be considered in development and skiboot 5.7 is certainly NOT suitable for POWER9 production environments.

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • platform/witherspoon: Enable eSEL logging

    OpenBMC stack added IPMI OEM extension to log eSEL events. Lets enable eSEL logging from OPAL side.

    See: https://github.com/openbmc/openpower-host-ipmi-oem/blob/d9296050bcece5c2eca5ede0932d944b0ced66c9/oemhandler.cpp#L142 (yes, that is the documentation)

  • hdat/i2c: Fix array version check

  • mem_region: Check for no-map in reserved nodes

    Regions with the no-map property should be handled seperately to “normal” firmware reservations. When creating mem_region regions from a reserved-memory DT node use the no-map property to select the right reservation type.

  • hdata/memory: Add memory reservations to the DT

    Currently we just add these to a list of pre-boot reserved regions which is then converted into a the contents of the /reserved-memory/ node just before Skiboot jumps into the firmware kernel.

    This approach is insufficent because we need to add the ibm,prd-instance labels to the various hostboot reserved regions. To do this we want to create these resevation nodes inside the HDAT parser rather than having the mem_region flattening code handle it. On P8 systems Hostboot placed its memory reservations under the /ibm,hostboot/ node and this patch makes the HDAT parser do the same.

Since Since skiboot-5.7-rc1:

  • HDAT: Add IPMI sensor data under /bmc node

  • numa/associativity: Add a new level of NUMA for GPU’s

    Today we have an issue where the NUMA nodes corresponding to GPU’s have the same affinity/distance as normal memory nodes. Our reference-points today supports two levels [0x4, 0x4] for normal systems and [0x4, 0x3] for Power8E systems. This patch adds a new level [0x4, X, 0x2] and uses node-id as at all levels for the GPU.

  • xive: Enable memory backing of queues

    This dedicates 6x64k pages of memory permanently for the XIVE to use for internal queue overflow. This allows the XIVE to deal with some corner cases where the internal queues might prove insufficient.

  • xive: Properly get rid of donated indirect pages during reset

    Otherwise they keep being used accross kexec causing memory corruption in subsequent kernels once KVM has been used.

  • cpu: Better handle unknown flags in opal_reinit_cpus()

    At the moment, if we get passed flags we don’t know about, we return OPAL_UNSUPPORTED but we still perform whatever actions was requied by the flags we do support. Additionally, on P8, we attempt a SLW re-init which hasn’t been supported since Murano DD2.0 and will crash your system.

    It’s too late to fix on existing systems so Linux will have to be careful at least on P8, but to avoid future issues let’s clean that up, make sure we only use slw_reinit() when HILE isn’t supported.

  • cpu: Unconditionally cleanup TLBs on P9 in opal_reinit_cpus()

    This can work around problems where Linux fails to properly cleanup part or all of the TLB on kexec.

  • Fix scom addresses for power9 nx checkstop hmi handling.

    Scom addresses for NX status, DMA & ENGINE FIR and PBI FIR has changed for Power9. Fixup thoes while handling nx checkstop for Power9.

  • Fix scom addresses for power9 core checkstop hmi handling.

    Scom addresses for CORE FIR (Fault Isolation Register) and Malfunction Alert Register has changed for Power9. Fixup those while handling core checkstop for Power9.

    Without this change HMI handler fails to check for correct reason for core checkstop on Power9.

  • core/mem_region: check return value of add_region

    The only sensible thing to do if this fails is to abort() as we’ve likely just failed reserving reserved memory regions, and nothing good comes from that.

Since Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • hdata: Reserve Trace Areas

    When hostboot is configured to setup in memory tracing it will reserve some memory for use by the hardware tracing facility. We need to mark these areas as off limits to the operating system and firmware.

  • hdata: Make out-of-range idata print at PR_DEBUG

    Some fields just aren’t populated on some systems.

  • hdata: Ignore unnamed memory reservations.

    Hostboot should name any and all memory reservations that it provides. Currently some hostboots export a broken reservation covering the first 256MB of memory and this causes the system to crash at boot due to an invalid free because this overlaps with the static “ibm,os-reserve” region (which covers the first 768MB of memory).

    According to the hostboot team unnamed reservations are invalid and can be ignored.

  • hdata: Check the Host I2C devices array version

    Currently this is not populated on FSP machines which causes some obnoxious errors to appear in the boot log. We also only want to parse version 1 of this structure since future versions will completely change the array item format.

  • Ensure P9 DD1 workarounds apply only to Nimbus

    The workarounds for P9 DD1 are only needed for Nimbus. P9 Cumulus will be DD1 but don’t need these same workarounds.

    This patch ensures the P9 DD1 workarounds only apply to Nimbus. It also renames some things to make clear what’s what.

  • cpu: Cleanup AMR and IAMR when re-initializing CPUs

    There’s a bug in current Linux kernels leaving crap in those registers accross kexec and not sanitizing them on boot. This breaks kexec under some circumstances (such as booting a hash kernel from a radix one on P9 DD2.0).

    The long term fix is in Linux, but this workaround is a reasonable way of “sanitizing” those SPRs when Linux calls opal_reinit_cpus() and shouldn’t have adverse effects.

    We could also use that same mechanism to cleanup other things as well such as restoring some other SPRs to their default value in the future.

  • Set POWER9 RPR SPR to 0x00000103070F1F3F. Same value as P8.

    Without this, thread priorities inside a core don’t work.

  • cpu: Support setting HID[RADIX] and set it by default on P9

    This adds new opal_reinit_cpus() flags to setup radix or hash mode in HID[8] on POWER9.

    By default HID[8] will be set. On P9 DD1.0, Linux will change it as needed. On P9 DD2.0 hash works in radix mode (radix is really “dual” mode) so KVM won’t break and existing kernels will work.

    Newer kernels built for hash will call this to clear the HID bit and thus get the full size of the TLB as an optimization.

  • Add “cleanup_global_tlb” for P9 and later

    Uses broadcast TLBIE’s to cleanup the TLB on all cores and on the nest MMU

  • xive: DD2.0 updates

    Add support for StoreEOI, fix StoreEOI MMIO offset in ESB page, and other cleanups

  • Update default TSCR value for P9 as recommended by HW folk.

  • xive: Fix initialisation of xive_cpu_state struct

    When using XIVE emulation with DEBUG=1, we run into crashes in log_add() due to the xive_cpu_state->log_pos being uninitialised (and thus, with DEBUG enabled, initialised to the poison value of 0x99999999).

PHB4

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • phb4: Add link training trace mode

    Add a mode to PHB4 to trace training process closely. This activates as soon as PERST is deasserted and produces human readable output of the process.

    This may increase training times since it duplicates some of the training code. This code has it’s own simple checks for fence and timeout but will fall through to the default training code once done.

    Output produced, looks like the “TRACE:” lines below:

    [    3.410799664,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: FRESET: Starts
    [    3.410802000,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: FRESET: Prepare for link down
    [    3.410806624,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: FRESET: Assert skipped
    [    3.410808848,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: FRESET: Deassert
    [    3.410812176,3] PHB#0001[0:1]: TRACE: 0x0000000101000000  0ms
    [    3.417170176,3] PHB#0001[0:1]: TRACE: 0x0000100101000000 12ms presence
    [    3.436289104,3] PHB#0001[0:1]: TRACE: 0x0000180101000000 49ms training
    [    3.436373312,3] PHB#0001[0:1]: TRACE: 0x00001d0811000000 49ms trained
    [    3.436420752,3] PHB#0001[0:1]: TRACE: Link trained.
    [    3.436967856,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: LINK: Start polling
    [    3.437482240,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: LINK: Electrical link detected
    [    3.437996864,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: LINK: Link is up
    [    4.438000048,7] PHB#0001[0:1]: LINK: Link is stable
    

    Enabled via nvram using:

    nvram -p ibm,skiboot --update-config pci-tracing=true
    
  • phb4: Improve reset and link training timing

    This improves PHB reset and link training timing.

  • phb4: Add phb4_check_reg() to sanity check failures

    This adds a function phb4_check_reg() to sanity check when we do MMIO reads from the PHB to make sure it’s not fenced.

  • phb4: Remove retry on electrical link timeout

    Currently we retry if we don’t detect an electrical link. This is pointless as all devices should respond in the given time.

    This patches removes this retry and just returns OPAL_HARDWARE if we don’t detect an electrical link.

    This has the additional benefit of improving boot times on machines that have badly wired presence detect (ie. says a device is present when there isn’t).

  • phb4: Read PERST signal rather than assuming it’s asserted

    Currently we assume on boot that PERST is asserted so that we can skip having to assert it ourselves.

    This instead reads the PERST status and determines if we need to assert it based on that.

  • phb4: Fix endian of TLP headers print

    Byte swap TLP headers so they are the same as the PCIe spec.

  • phb4: Change timeouts prints to error level

    If the link doesn’t have a electrical link or the link doesn’t train we should make that more obvious to the user.

  • phb4: Better logs why the slot didn’t work

    Better logs why the slot didn’t work and make it a PR_ERR so users see it by default.

  • phb4: Force verbose EEH logging

    Force verbose EEH. This is a heavy handed and we should turn if off later as things stabilise, but is useful for now.

  • phb4: Initialization sequence updates

    Mostly errata workarounds, some DD1 specific.

    The step Init_5 was moved to Init_16, so the numbering was updated to reflect this.

Since skiboot-5.7-rc1:

  • phb4: Do more retries on link training failures Currently we only retry once when we have a link training failure. This changes this to be 3 retries as 1 retry is not giving us enough reliablity.

    This will increase the boot time, especially on systems where we incorrectly detect a link presence when there really is nothing present. I’ll post a followup patch to optimise our timings to help mitigate this later.

  • phb4: Workaround phy lockup by doing full PHB reset on retry

    For PHB4 it’s possible that the phy may end up in a bad state where it can no longer recieve data. This can manifest as the link not retraining. A simple PERST will not clear this. The PHB must be completely reset.

    This changes the retry state to CRESET to do this.

    This issue may also manifest itself as the link training in a degraded state (lower speed or narrower width). This patch doesn’t attempt to fix that (will come later).

  • pci: Add ability to trace timing

    PCI link training is responsible for a huge chunk of the skiboot boot time, so add the ability to trace it waiting in the main state machine.

  • pci: Print resetting PHB notice at higher log level

    Currently during boot there a long delay while we wait for the PHBs to be reset and train. During this time, there is no output from skiboot and the last message doesn’t give an indication of what’s happening.

    This boosts the PHB reset message from info to notice so users can see what’s happening during this long period of waiting.

  • phb4: Only set one bit in nfir

    The MPIPL procedure says to only set bit 26 when forcing the PEC into freeze mode. Currently we set bits 24-27.

    This changes the code to follow spec and only set bit 26.

  • phb4: Fix order of pfir/nfir clearing in CRESET

    According to the workbook, pfir must be cleared before the nfir. The way we have it now causes the nfir to not clear properly in some error circumstances.

    This swaps the order to match the workbook.

  • phb4: Remove incorrect state transition

    When waiting in PHB4_SLOT_CRESET_WAIT_CQ for transations to end, we incorrectly move onto the next state. Generally we don’t hit this as the transactions have ended already anyway.

    This removes the incorrect state transition.

  • phb4: Set default lane equalisation

    Set default lane equalisation if there is nothing in the device-tree.

    Default value taken from hdat and confirmed by hardware team. Neatens the code up a bit too.

  • hdata: Fix phb4 lane-eq property generation

    The lane-eq data we get from hdat is all 7s but what we end up in the device tree is:

    xscom@603fc00000000/pbcq@4010c00/stack@0/ibm,lane-eq
                     00000000 31c339e0 00000000 0000000c
                     00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
                     00000000 31c30000 77777777 77777777
                     77777777 77777777 77777777 77777777
    

    This fixes grabbing the properties from hdat and fixes the call to put them in the device tree.

  • phb4: Fix PHB4 fence recovery.

    We had a few problems:

    • We used the wrong register to trigger the reset (spec bug)
    • We should clear the PFIR and NFIR while the reset is asserted
    • … and in the right order !
    • We should only apply the DD1 workaround after the reset has been lifted.
    • We should ensure we use ASB whenever we are fenced or doing a CRESET
    • Make config ops write with ASB
  • phb4: Verbose EEH options

    Enabled via nvram pci-eeh-verbose=true. ie.

    nvram -p ibm,skiboot --update-config pci-eeh-verbose=true
    
  • phb4: Print more info when PHB fences

    For now at PHBERR level. We don’t have room in the diags data passed to Linux for these unfortunately.

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • phb4: Fix number of index bits in IODA tables

    On PHB4 the number of index bits in the IODA table address register was bumped to 10 bits to accomodate for 1024 MSIs and 1024 TVEs (DD2).

    However our macro only defined the field to be 9 bits, thus causing “interesting” behaviours on some systems.

  • phb4: Harden init with bad PHBs

    Currently if we read all 1’s from the EEH or IRQ capabilities, we end up train wrecking on some other random code (eg. an assert() in xive).

    This hardens the PHB4 code to look for these bad reads and more gracefully fails the init for that PHB alone. This allows the rest of the system to boot and ignore those bad PHBs.

  • phb4 capi (i.e. CAPI2): Handle HMI events

    Find the CAPP on the chip associated with the HMI event for PHB4. The recovery mode (re-initialization of the capp, resume of functional operations) is only available with P9 DD2. A new patch will be provided to support this feature.

  • phb4 capi (i.e. CAPI2): Enable capi mode for PHB4

    Enable the Coherently attached processor interface. The PHB is used as a CAPI interface. CAPI Adapters can be connected to either PEC0 or PEC2. Single port CAPI adapter can be connected to either PEC0 or PEC2, but Dual-Port Adapter can be only connected to PEC2 * CAPP0 attached to PHB0(PEC0 - single port) * CAPP1 attached to PHB3(PEC2 - single or dual port)

  • hw/phb4: Rework phb4_get_presence_state()

    There are two issues in current implementation: It should return errcode visibile to Linux, which has prefix OPAL_*. The code isn’t very obvious.

    This returns OPAL_HARDWARE when the PHB is broken. Otherwise, OPAL_SUCCESS is always returned. In the mean while, It refactors the code to make it obvious: OPAL_PCI_SLOT_PRESENT is returned when the presence signal (low active) or PCIe link is active. Otherwise, OPAL_PCI_SLOT_EMPTY is returned.

  • phb4: Error injection for config space

    Implement CFG (config space) error injection.

    This works the same as PHB3. MMIO and DMA error injection require a rewrite, so they’re unsupported for now.

    While it’s not feature complete, this at least provides an easy way to inject an error that will trigger EEH.

  • phb4: Error clear implementation

  • phb4: Mask link down errors during reset

    During a hot reset the PCI link will drop, so we need to mask link down events to prevent unnecessary errors.

  • phb4: Implement root port initialization

    phb4_root_port_init() was a NOP before, so fix that.

  • phb4: Complete reset implementation

    This implements complete reset (creset) functionality for POWER9 DD1.

    Only partially tested and contends with some DD1 errata, but it’s a start.

  • phb4: Activate shared PCI slot on witherspoon

    Witherspoon systems come with a ‘shared’ PCI slot: physically, it looks like a x16 slot, but it’s actually two x8 slots connected to two PHBs of two different chips. Taking advantage of it requires some logic on the PCI adapter. Only the Mellanox CX5 adapter is known to support it at the time of this writing.

    This patch enables support for the shared slot on witherspoon if a x16 adapter is detected. Each x8 slot has a presence bit, so both bits need to be set for the activation to take place. Slot sharing is activated through a gpio.

    Note that there’s no easy way to be sure that the card is indeed a shared-slot compatible PCI adapter and not a normal x16 card. Plugging a normal x16 adapter on the shared slot should be avoided on witherspoon, as the link won’t train on the second slot, resulting in a timeout and a longer boot time. Only the first slot is usable and the x16 adapter will end up using only half the lines.

    If the PCI card plugged on the physical slot is only x8 (or less), then the presence bit of the second slot is not set, so this patch does nothing. The x8 (or less) adapter should work like on any other physical slot.

  • phb4: Block D-state power management on direct slots

    As current revisions of PHB4 don’t properly handle the resulting L1 link transition.

  • phb4: Call pci config filters

  • phb4: Mask out write-1-to-clear registers in RC cfg

    The root complex config space only supports 4-byte accesses. Thus, when the client requests a smaller size write, we do a read-modify-write to the register.

    However, some register have bits defined as “write 1 to clear”.

    If we do a RMW cycles on such a register and such bits are 1 in the part that the client doesn’t intend to modify, we will accidentally write back those 1’s and clear the corresponding bit.

    This avoids it by masking out those magic bits from the “old” value read from the register.

  • phb4: Properly mask out link down errors during reset

  • phb3/4: Silence a useless warning

    PHB’s don’t have base location codes on non-FSP systems and it’s normal.

  • phb4: Workaround bug in spec 053

    Wait for DLP PGRESET to clear after lifting the PCIe core reset

  • phb4: DD2.0 updates

    Support StoreEOI, full complements of PEs (twice as big TVT) and other updates.

    Also renumber init steps to match spec 063

NPU2

Note that currently NPU2 support is limited to POWER9 DD1 hardware.

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • platforms/astbmc/witherspoon.c: Add NPU2 slot mappings

    For NVLink2 to function PCIe devices need to be associated with the right NVLinks. This association is supposed to be passed down to Skiboot via HDAT but those fields are still not correctly filled out. To work around this we add slot tables for the NVLinks similar to what we have for P8+.

  • hw/npu2.c: Fix device aperture calculation

    The POWER9 NPU2 implements an address compression scheme to compress 56-bit P9 physical addresses to 47-bit GPU addresses. System software needs to know both addresses, unfortunately the calculation of the compressed address was incorrect. Fix it here.

  • hw/npu2.c: Change MCD BAR allocation order

    MCD BARs need to be correctly aligned to the size of the region. As GPU memory is allocated from the top of memory down we should start allocating from the highest GPU memory address to the lowest to ensure correct alignment.

  • NPU2: Add flag to nvlink config space indicating DL reset state

    Device drivers need to be able to determine if the DL is out of reset or not so they can safely probe to see if links have already been trained. This patch adds a flag to the vendor specific config space indicating if the DL is out of reset.

  • hw/npu2.c: Hardcode MSR_SF when setting up npu XTS contexts

    We don’t support anything other than 64-bit mode for address translations so we can safely hardcode it.

  • hw/npu2-hw-procedures.c: Add nvram option to override zcal calculations

    In some rare cases the zcal state machine may fail and flag an error. According to hardware designers it is sometimes ok to ignore this failure and use nominal values for the calculations. In this case we add a nvram variable (nv_zcal_override) which will cause skiboot to ignore the failure and use the nominal value specified in nvram.

  • npu2: Fix npu2_{read,write}_4b()

    When writing or reading 4-byte values, we need to use the upper half of the 64-bit SCOM register.

    Fix npu2_{read,write}_4b() and their callers to use uint32_t, and appropriately shift the value being written or returned.

  • hw/npu2.c: Fix opal_npu_map_lpar to search for existing BDF

  • hw/npu2-hw-procedures.c: Fix running of zcal procedure

    The zcal procedure should only be run once per obus (ie. once per group of 3 links). Clean up the code and fix the potential buffer overflow due to a typo. Also updates the zcal settings to their proper values.

  • hw/npu2.c: Add memory coherence directory programming

    The memory coherence directory (MCD) needs to know which system memory addresses belong to the GPU. This amounts to setting a BAR and a size in the MCD to cover the addresses assigned to each of the GPUs. To ease assignment we assume GPUs are assigned memory in a contiguous block per chip.

OCC/Power Management

With this release, it’s possible to boot POWER9 systems with the OCC enabled and change CPU frequencies. Doing so does require other firmware components to also support this (otherwise the frequency will not be set).

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • occ: Skip setting cores to nominal frequency in P9

    In P9, once OCC is up, it is supposed to setup the cores to nominal frequency. So skip this step in OPAL.

  • occ: Fix Pstate ordering for P9

    In P9 the pstate values are positive. They are continuous set of unsigned integers [0 to +N] where Pmax is 0 and Pmin is N. The linear ordering of pstates for P9 has changed compared to P8. P8 has neagtive pstate values advertised as [0 to -N] where Pmax is 0 and Pmin is -N. This patch adds helper routines to abstract pstate comparison with pmax and adds sanity pstate limit checks. This patch also fixes pstate arithmetic by using labs().

  • p8-i2c: occ: Add support for OCC to use I2C engines

    This patch adds support to share the I2C engines with host and OCC. OCC uses I2C engines to read DIMM temperatures and to communicate with GPU. OCC Flag register is used for locking between host and OCC. Host requests for the bus by setting a bit in OCC Flag register. OCC sends an interrupt to indicate the change in ownership.

opal-prd/PRD

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • opal-prd: Handle SBE passthrough message passing

    This patch adds support to send SBE pass through command to HBRT.

  • SBE: Add passthrough command support

    SBE sends passthrough command. We have to capture this interrupt and send event to HBRT via opal-prd (user space daemon).

  • opal-prd: hook up reset_pm_complex

    This change provides the facility to invoke HBRT’s reset_pm_complex, in the same manner is done with process_occ_reset previously.

    We add a control command for opal-prd pm-complex reset, which is just an alias for occ_reset at this stage.

  • prd: Implement firmware side of opaque PRD channel

    This change introduces the firmware side of the opaque HBRT <–> OPAL message channel. We define a base message format to be shared with HBRT (in include/prd-fw-msg.h), and allow firmware requests and responses to be sent over this channel.

    We don’t currently have any notifications defined, so have nothing to do for firmware_notify() at this stage.

  • opal-prd: Add firmware_request & firmware_notify implementations

    This change adds the implementation of firmware_request() and firmware_notify(). To do this, we need to add a message queue, so that we can properly handle out-of-order messages coming from firmware.

  • opal-prd: Add support for variable-sized messages

    With the introductuion of the opaque firmware channel, we want to support variable-sized messages. Rather than expecting to read an entire ‘struct opal_prd_msg’ in one read() call, we can split this over mutiple reads, potentially expanding our message buffer.

  • opal-prd: Sync hostboot interfaces with HBRT

    This change adds new callbacks defined for p9, and the base thunks for the added calls.

  • opal-prd: interpret log level prefixes from HBRT

    Interpret the (optional) *_MRK log prefixes on HBRT messages, and set the syslog log priority to suit.

  • opal-prd: Add occ reset to usage text

  • opal-prd: allow different chips for occ control actions

    The occ reset and occ error actions can both take a chip id argument, but we’re currently just using zero. This change changes the control message format to pass the chip ID from the control process to the opal-prd daemon.

IBM FSP based platforms

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • FSP/CONSOLE: Do not enable input irq in write path

    We use irq for reading input from console, but not in output path. Hence do not enable input irq in write path.

    Fixes : 583c8203 (fsp/console: Allocate irq for each hvc console)

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • FSP/CONSOLE: Fix possible NULL dereference

  • platforms/ibm-fsp/firenze: Fix PCI slot power-off pattern

    When powering off the PCI slot, the corresponding bits should be set to 0bxx00xx00 instead of 0bxx11xx11. Otherwise, the specified PCI slot can’t be put into power-off state. Fortunately, it didn’t introduce any side-effects so far.

  • FSP/CONSOLE: Workaround for unresponsive ipmi daemon

    We use TCE mapped area to write data to console. Console header (fsp_serbuf_hdr) is modified by both FSP and OPAL (OPAL updates next_in pointer in fsp_serbuf_hdr and FSP updates next_out pointer).

    Kernel makes opal_console_write() OPAL call to write data to console. OPAL write data to TCE mapped area and sends MBOX command to FSP. If our console becomes full and we have data to write to console, we keep on waiting until FSP reads data.

    In some corner cases, where FSP is active but not responding to console MBOX message (due to buggy IPMI) and we have heavy console write happening from kernel, then eventually our console buffer becomes full. At this point OPAL starts sending OPAL_BUSY_EVENT to kernel. Kernel will keep on retrying. This is creating kernel soft lockups. In some extreme case when every CPU is trying to write to console, user will not be able to ssh and thinks system is hang.

    If we reset FSP or restart IPMI daemon on FSP, system recovers and everything becomes normal.

    This patch adds workaround to above issue by returning OPAL_HARDWARE when cosole is full. Side effect of this patch is, we may endup dropping latest console data. But better to drop console data than system hang.

  • FSP: Set status field in response message for timed out message

    For timed out FSP messages, we set message status as “fsp_msg_timeout”. But most FSP driver users (like surviellance) are ignoring this field. They always look for FSP returned status value in callback function (second byte in word1). So we endup treating timed out message as success response from FSP.

    Sample output:

    [69902.432509048,7] SURV: Sending the heartbeat command to FSP
    [70023.226860117,4] FSP: Response from FSP timed out, word0 = d66a00d7, word1 = 0 state: 3
    ....
    [70023.226901445,7] SURV: Received heartbeat acknowledge from FSP
    [70023.226903251,3] FSP: fsp_trigger_reset() entry
    

    Here SURV code thought it got valid response from FSP. But actually we didn’t receive response from FSP.

    This patch fixes above issue by updating status field in response structure.

  • FSP: Improve timeout message

  • FSP/RTC: Fix possible FSP R/R issue in rtc write path

  • hw/fsp/rtc: read/write cached rtc tod on fsp hir.

    Currently fsp-rtc reads/writes the cached RTC TOD on an fsp reset. Use latest fsp_in_rr() function to properly read the cached rtc value when fsp reset initiated by the hir.

    Below is the kernel trace when we set hw clock, when hir process starts.

    [ 1727.775824] NMI watchdog: BUG: soft lockup - CPU#57 stuck for 23s! [hwclock:7688]
    [ 1727.775856] Modules linked in: vmx_crypto ibmpowernv ipmi_powernv uio_pdrv_genirq ipmi_devintf powernv_op_panel uio ipmi_msghandler powernv_rng leds_powernv ip_tables x_tables autofs4 ses enclosure scsi_transport_sas crc32c_vpmsum lpfc ipr tg3 scsi_transport_fc
    [ 1727.775883] CPU: 57 PID: 7688 Comm: hwclock Not tainted 4.10.0-14-generic #16-Ubuntu
    [ 1727.775883] task: c000000fdfdc8400 task.stack: c000000fdfef4000
    [ 1727.775884] NIP: c00000000090540c LR: c0000000000846f4 CTR: 000000003006dd70
    [ 1727.775885] REGS: c000000fdfef79a0 TRAP: 0901   Not tainted  (4.10.0-14-generic)
    [ 1727.775886] MSR: 9000000000009033 <SF,HV,EE,ME,IR,DR,RI,LE>
    [ 1727.775889]   CR: 28024442  XER: 20000000
    [ 1727.775890] CFAR: c00000000008472c SOFTE: 1
                   GPR00: 0000000030005128 c000000fdfef7c20 c00000000144c900 fffffffffffffff4
                   GPR04: 0000000028024442 c00000000090540c 9000000000009033 0000000000000000
                   GPR08: 0000000000000000 0000000031fc4000 c000000000084710 9000000000001003
                   GPR12: c0000000000846e8 c00000000fba0100
    [ 1727.775897] NIP [c00000000090540c] opal_set_rtc_time+0x4c/0xb0
    [ 1727.775899] LR [c0000000000846f4] opal_return+0xc/0x48
    [ 1727.775899] Call Trace:
    [ 1727.775900] [c000000fdfef7c20] [c00000000090540c] opal_set_rtc_time+0x4c/0xb0 (unreliable)
    [ 1727.775901] [c000000fdfef7c60] [c000000000900828] rtc_set_time+0xb8/0x1b0
    [ 1727.775903] [c000000fdfef7ca0] [c000000000902364] rtc_dev_ioctl+0x454/0x630
    [ 1727.775904] [c000000fdfef7d40] [c00000000035b1f4] do_vfs_ioctl+0xd4/0x8c0
    [ 1727.775906] [c000000fdfef7de0] [c00000000035bab4] SyS_ioctl+0xd4/0xf0
    [ 1727.775907] [c000000fdfef7e30] [c00000000000b184] system_call+0x38/0xe0
    [ 1727.775908] Instruction dump:
    [ 1727.775909] f821ffc1 39200000 7c832378 91210028 38a10020 39200000 38810028 f9210020
    [ 1727.775911] 4bfffe6d e8810020 80610028 4b77f61d <60000000> 7c7f1b78 3860000a 2fbffff4
    

    This is found when executing the testcase https://github.com/open-power/op-test-framework/blob/master/testcases/fspresetReload.py

    With this fix ran fsp hir torture testcase in the above test which is working fine.

  • occ: Set return variable to correct value

    When entering this section of code rc will be zero. If fsp_mkmsg() fails the code responsible for printing an error message won’t be set. Resetting rc should allow for the error case to trigger if fsp_mkmsg fails.

  • capp: Fix hang when CAPP microcode LID is missing on FSP machine

    When the LID is absent, we fail early with an error from start_preload_resource. In that case, capp_ucode_info.load_result isn’t set properly causing a subsequent capp_lid_download() to call wait_for_resource_loaded() on something that isn’t being loaded, thus hanging.

  • FSP: Add check to detect FSP R/R inside fsp_sync_msg()

    OPAL sends MBOX message to FSP and updates message state from fsp_msg_queued -> fsp_msg_sent. fsp_sync_msg() queues message and waits until we get response from FSP. During FSP R/R we move outstanding MBOX messages from msgq to rr_queue including inflight message (fsp_reset_cmdclass()). But we are not resetting inflight message state.

    In extreme croner case where we sent message to FSP via fsp_sync_msg() path and FSP R/R happens before getting respose from FSP, then we will endup waiting in fsp_sync_msg() until everything becomes normal.

    This patch adds fsp_in_rr() check to fsp_sync_msg() and return error to caller

    if FSP is in R/R.

  • FSP: Add check to detect FSP R/R inside fsp_sync_msg()

    OPAL sends MBOX message to FSP and updates message state from fsp_msg_queued -> fsp_msg_sent. fsp_sync_msg() queues message and waits until we get response from FSP. During FSP R/R we move outstanding MBOX messages from msgq to rr_queue including inflight message (fsp_reset_cmdclass()). But we are not resetting inflight message state.

    In extreme croner case where we sent message to FSP via fsp_sync_msg() path and FSP R/R happens before getting respose from FSP, then we will endup waiting in fsp_sync_msg() until everything becomes normal.

    This patch adds fsp_in_rr() check to fsp_sync_msg() and return error to caller

    if FSP is in R/R.

  • capp: Fix hang when CAPP microcode LID is missing on FSP machine

    When the LID is absent, we fail early with an error from start_preload_resource. In that case, capp_ucode_info.load_result isn’t set properly causing a subsequent capp_lid_download() to call wait_for_resource_loaded() on something that isn’t being loaded, thus hanging.

  • FSP/CONSOLE: Do not free fsp_msg in error path

    as we reuse same msg to send next output message.

  • platform/zz: Acknowledge OCC_LOAD mbox message in ZZ

    In P9 FSP box, OCC image is pre-loaded. So do not handle the load command and send SUCCESS to FSP on recieving OCC_LOAD mbox message.

  • FSP/RTC: Improve error log

astbmc systems

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • platforms/astbmc: Don’t validate model on palmetto

    The platform isn’t compatible with palmetto until the root device-tree node’s “model” property is NULL or “palmetto”. However, we could have “TN71-BP012” for the property on palmetto.

    linux# cat /proc/device-tree/model
    TN71-BP012
    

    This skips the validation on root device-tree node’s “model” property on palmetto, meaning we check the “compatible” property only.

General

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • core/pci: Fix mem-leak on fast-reboot

    Fast-reboot has a memory leak which causes the system to crash after about 250 fast-reboots. The patch fixes the memory leak. The cause of the leak was the pci_device’s being freed, without freeing the pci_slot within it.

  • gcov: properly handle gard and pflash code coverage

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • Reduce log level on non-error log messages

    90% of what we print isn’t useful to a normal user. This dramatically reduces the amount of messages printed by OPAL in normal circumstances.

  • init: Silence messages and call ourselves “OPAL”

  • psi: Switch to ESB mode later

    There’s an errata, if we switch to ESB mode before setting up the various ESB mode related registers, a pending interrupts can go wrong.

  • lpc: Enable “new” SerIRQ mode

  • hw/ipmi/ipmi-sel: missing newline in prlog warning

  • p8-i2c OCC lock: fix locking in p9_i2c_bus_owner_change

  • Convert important polling loops to spin at lowest SMT priority

    The pattern of calling cpu_relax() inside a polling loop does not suit the powerpc SMT priority instructions. Prefrred is to set a low priority then spin until break condition is reached, then restore priority.

  • Improve cpu_idle when PM is disabled

    Split cpu_idle() into cpu_idle_delay() and cpu_idle_job() rather than requesting the idle type as a function argument. Have those functions provide a default polling (non-PM) implentation which spin at the lowest SMT priority.

  • core/fdt: Always add a reserve map

    Currently we skip adding the reserved ranges block to the generated FDT blob if we are excluding the root node. This can result in a DTB that dtc will barf on because the reserved memory ranges overlap with the start of the dt_struct block. As an example:

    $ fdtdump broken.dtb -d
    /dts-v1/;
    // magic:               0xd00dfeed
    // totalsize:           0x7f3 (2035)
    // off_dt_struct:       0x30  <----\
    // off_dt_strings:      0x7b8       | this is bad!
    // off_mem_rsvmap:      0x30  <----/
    // version:             17
    // last_comp_version:   16
    // boot_cpuid_phys:     0x0
    // size_dt_strings:     0x3b
    // size_dt_struct:      0x788
    
    /memreserve/ 0x100000000 0x300000004;
    /memreserve/ 0x3300000001 0x169626d2c;
    /memreserve/ 0x706369652d736c6f 0x7473000000000003;
            *continues*
    

    With this patch:

    $ fdtdump working.dtb -d
    /dts-v1/;
    // magic:               0xd00dfeed
    // totalsize:           0x803 (2051)
    // off_dt_struct:       0x40
    // off_dt_strings:      0x7c8
    // off_mem_rsvmap:      0x30
    // version:             17
    // last_comp_version:   16
    // boot_cpuid_phys:     0x0
    // size_dt_strings:     0x3b
    // size_dt_struct:      0x788
    
    // 0040: tag: 0x00000001 (FDT_BEGIN_NODE)
    / {
    // 0048: tag: 0x00000003 (FDT_PROP)
    // 07fb: string: phandle
    // 0054: value
        phandle = <0x00000001>;
            *continues*
    
  • hw/lpc-mbox: Use message registers for interrupts

    Currently the BMC raises the interrupt using the BMC control register. It does so on all accesses to the 16 ‘data’ registers meaning that when the BMC only wants to set the ATTN (on which we have interrupts enabled) bit we will also get a control register based interrupt.

    The solution here is to mask that interrupt permanantly and enable interrupts on the protocol defined ‘response’ data byte.

PCI

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • pci: Wait 20ms before checking presence detect on PCIe

    As the PHB presence logic has a debounce timer that can take a while to settle.

  • phb3+iov: Fixup support for config space filters

    The filter should be called before the HW access and its return value control whether to perform the access or not

  • core/pci: Use PCI slot’s power facality in pci_enable_bridge()

    The current implmentation has incorrect assumptions: there is always a PCI slot associated with root port and PCIe switch downstream port and all of them are capable to change its power state by register PCICAP_EXP_SLOTCTL. Firstly, there might not a PCI slot associated with the root port or PCIe switch downstream port. Secondly, the power isn’t controlled by standard config register (PCICAP_EXP_SLOTCTL). There are I2C slave devices used to control the power states on Tuleta.

    In order to use the PCI slot’s methods to manage the power states, this does:

    • Introduce PCI_SLOT_FLAG_ENFORCE, indicates the request operation is enforced to be applied.
    • pci_enable_bridge() is split into 3 functions: pci_bridge_power_on() to power it on; pci_enable_bridge() as a place holder and pci_bridge_wait_link() to wait the downstream link to come up.
    • In pci_bridge_power_on(), the PCI slot’s specific power management methods are used if there is a PCI slot associated with the PCIe switch downstream port or root port.
  • platforms/astbmc/slots.c: Allow comparison of bus numbers when matching slots

    When matching devices on multiple down stream PLX busses we need to compare more than just the device-id of the PCIe BDFN, so increase the mask to do so.

Debugging, Tests and simulators

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • boot_tests: add PFLASH_TO_COPY for OpenBMC

  • travis: Add debian stretch and unstable

    At the moment, we mark them both as being able to fail, as we’re hitting an assert in one of the unit tests on debian stretch, and that hasn’t yet been chased down.

  • core/backtrace: Serialise printing backtraces

    Add a lock so that only one thread can print a backtrace at a time. This should prevent multiple threads from garbaling each other’s backtraces.

Since skiboot-5.7-rc1:

  • lpc: remove double LPC prefix from messages
  • opal-ci/fetch-debian-jessie-installer: follow redirects Fixes some CI failures
  • test/qemu-jessie: bail out fast on kernel panic
  • test/qemu-jessie: dump boot log on failure
  • travis: add fedora26
  • xz: add fallthrough annotations to silence GCC7 warning

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • boot-tests: add OpenBMC support

  • boot_test.sh: Add SMC BMC support

    Your BMC needs a special debug image flashed to use this, the exact image and methods aren’t something I can publish here, but if you work for IBM or SMC you can find out from the right sources.

    A few things are needed to move around to be able to flash to a SMC BMC.

    For a start, the SSH daemon will only accept connections after a special incantation (which I also can’t share), but you should put that in the ~/.skiboot_boot_tests file along with some other default login information we don’t publicise too broadly (because Security Through Obscurity is obviously a good idea….)

    We also can’t just directly “ssh /bin/true”, we need an expect script, and we can’t scp, but we can anonymous rsync!

    You also need a pflash binary to copy over.

  • hdata_to_dt: Add PVR overrides to the usage text

  • mambo: Add a reservation for the initramfs

    On most systems the initramfs is loaded inside the part of memory reserved for the OS [0x0-0x30000000] and skiboot will never touch it. On mambo it’s loaded at 0x80000000 and if you’re unlucky skiboot can allocate over the top of it and corrupt the initramfs blob.

    There might be the downside that the kernel cannot re-use the initramfs memory since it’s marked as reserved, but the kernel might also free it anyway.

  • mambo: Update P9 PVR to reflect Scale out 24 core chips

    The P9 PVR bits 48:51 don’t indicate a revision but instead different configurations. From BookIV we have:

    Bits Configuration
    0 Scale out 12 cores
    1 Scale out 24 cores
    2 Scale up 12 cores
    3 Scale up 24 cores

    Skiboot will mostly the use “Scale out 24 core” configuration (ie. SMT4 not SMT8) so reflect this in mambo.

  • core: Move enable_mambo_console() into chip initialisation

    Rather than having a wart in main_cpu_entry() that initialises the mambo console, we can move it into init_chips() which is where we discover that we’re on mambo.

  • mambo: Create multiple chips when we have multiple CPUs

    Currently when we boot mambo with multiple CPUs, we create multiple CPU nodes in the device tree, and each claims to be on a separate chip.

    However we don’t create multiple xscom nodes, which means skiboot only knows about a single chip, and all CPUs end up on it. At the moment mambo is not able to create multiple xscom controllers. We can create fake ones, just by faking the device tree up, but that seems uglier than this solution.

    So create a mambo-chip for each CPU other than 0, to tell skiboot we want a separate chip created. This then enables Linux to see multiple chips:

    smp: Brought up 2 nodes, 2 CPUs
    numa: Node 0 CPUs: 0
    numa: Node 1 CPUs: 1
    
  • chip: Add support for discovering chips on mambo

    Currently the only way for skiboot to discover chips is by looking for xscom nodes. But on mambo it’s currently not possible to create multiple xscom nodes, which means we can only simulate a single chip system.

    However it seems we can fairly cleanly add support for a special mambo chip node, and use that to instantiate multiple chips.

    Add a check in init_chip() that we’re not clobbering an already initialised chip, now that we have two places that initialise chips.

  • mambo: Make xscom claim to be DD 2.0

    In the mambo tcl we set the CPU version to DD 2.0, because mambo is not bug compatible with DD 1.

    But in xscom_read_cfam_chipid() we have a hard coded value, to work around the lack of the f000f register, which claims to be P9 DD 1.0.

    This doesn’t seem to cause crashes or anything, but at boot we do see:

    [    0.003893084,5] XSCOM: chip 0x0 at 0x1a0000000000 [P9N DD1.0]
    

    So fix it to claim that the xscom is also DD 2.0 to match the CPU.

  • mambo: Match whole string when looking up symbols with linsym/skisym

    linsym/skisym use a regex to match the symbol name, and accepts a partial match against the entry in the symbol map, which can lead to somewhat confusing results, eg:

    systemsim % linsym early_setup
    0xc000000000027890
    systemsim % linsym early_setup$
    0xc000000000aa8054
    systemsim % linsym early_setup_secondary
    0xc000000000027890
    

    I don’t think that’s the behaviour we want, so append a $ to the name so that the symbol has to match against the whole entry, eg:

    systemsim % linsym early_setup
    0xc000000000aa8054
    
  • Disable nap on P8 Mambo, public release has bugs

  • mambo: Allow loading multiple CPIOs

    Currently we have support for loading a single CPIO and telling Linux to use it as the initrd. But the Linux code actually supports having multiple CPIOs contiguously in memory, between initrd-start and end, and will unpack them all in order. That is a really nice feature as it means you can have a base CPIO with your root filesystem, and then tack on others as you need for various tests etc.

    So expand the logic to handle SKIBOOT_INITRD, and treat it as a comma separated list of CPIOs to load. I chose comma as it’s fairly rare in filenames, but we could make it space, colon, whatever. Or we could add a new environment variable entirely. The code also supports trimming whitespace from the values, so you can have “cpio1, cpio2”.

  • hdata/test: Add memory reservations to hdata_to_dt

    Currently memory reservations are parsed, but since they are not processed until mem_region_init() they don’t appear in the output device tree blob. Several bugs have been found with memory reservations so we want them to be part of the test output.

    Add them and clean up several usages of printf() since we want only the dtb to appear in standard out.

pflash/libffs

Since skiboot-5.7-rc2:

  • pflash option to retrieve PNOR partition flags

    This commit extends pflash with an option to retrieve and print information for a particular partition, including the content from “pflash -i” and a verbose list of set miscellaneous flags. -i option is also updated to print a short list of flags in addition to the ECC flag, with one character per flag. A test of the new option is included in libflash/test.

Since skiboot-5.6.0:

  • libflash/libffs: Zero checksum words

    On writing ffs entries to flash libffs doesn’t zero checksum words before calculating the checksum across the entire structure. This causes an inaccurate calculation of the checksum as it may calculate a checksum on non-zero checksum bytes.

  • libffs: Fix ffs_lookup_part() return value

    It would return success when the part wasn’t found

  • libflash/libffs: Correctly update the actual size of the partition

    libffs has been updating FFS partition information in the wrong place which leads to incomplete erases and corruption.

  • libflash: Initialise entries list earlier

    In the bail-out path we call ffs_close() to tear down the partially initialised ffs_handle. ffs_close() expects the entries list to be initialised so we need to do that earlier to prevent a null pointer dereference.

mbox-flash

mbox-flash is the emerging standard way of talking to host PNOR flash on POWER9 systems.

  • libflash/mbox-flash: Implement MARK_WRITE_ERASED mbox call

    Version two of the mbox-flash protocol defines a new command: MARK_WRITE_ERASED.

    This command provides a simple way to mark a region of flash as all 0xff without the need to go and write all 0xff. This is an optimisation as there is no need for an erase before a write, it is the responsibility of the BMC to deal with the flash correctly, however in v1 it was ambiguous what a client should do if the flash should be erased but not actually written to. This allows of a optimal path to resolve this problem.

  • libflash/mbox-flash: Update to V2 of the protocol

    Updated version 2 of the protocol can be found at: https://github.com/openbmc/mboxbridge/blob/master/Documentation/mbox_protocol.md

    This commit changes mbox-flash such that it will preferentially talk version 2 to any capable daemon but still remain capable of talking to v1 daemons.

    Version two changes some of the command definitions for increased consistency and usability. Version two includes more attention bits - these are now dealt with at a simple level.

  • libflash/mbox-flash: Implement MARK_WRITE_ERASED mbox call

    Version two of the mbox-flash protocol defines a new command: MARK_WRITE_ERASED.

    This command provides a simple way to mark a region of flash as all 0xff without the need to go and write all 0xff. This is an optimisation as there is no need for an erase before a write, it is the responsibility of the BMC to deal with the flash correctly, however in v1 it was ambiguous what a client should do if the flash should be erased but not actually written to. This allows of a optimal path to resolve this problem.

  • libflash/mbox-flash: Update to V2 of the protocol

    Updated version 2 of the protocol can be found at: https://github.com/openbmc/mboxbridge/blob/master/Documentation/mbox_protocol.md

    This commit changes mbox-flash such that it will preferentially talk version 2 to any capable daemon but still remain capable of talking to v1 daemons.

    Version two changes some of the command definitions for increased consistency and usability. Version two includes more attention bits - these are now dealt with at a simple level.

  • hw/lpc-mbox: Use message registers for interrupts

    Currently the BMC raises the interrupt using the BMC control register. It does so on all accesses to the 16 ‘data’ registers meaning that when the BMC only wants to set the ATTN (on which we have interrupts enabled) bit we will also get a control register based interrupt.

    The solution here is to mask that interrupt permanantly and enable interrupts on the protocol defined ‘response’ data byte.

Contributors

  • Processed 232 csets from 29 developers.
  • 1 employer found
  • A total of 13043 lines added, 2517 removed (delta 10526)

Extending the analysis done for some previous releases, we can see our trends in code review across versions:

Release csets Ack % Reviews % Tested % Reported %
5.0 329 15 (5%) 20 (6%) 1 (0%) 0 (0%)
5.1 372 13 (3%) 38 (10%) 1 (0%) 4 (1%)
5.2-rc1 334 20 (6%) 34 (10%) 6 (2%) 11 (3%)
5.3-rc1 302 36 (12%) 53 (18%) 4 (1%) 5 (2%)
5.4 361 16 (4%) 28 (8%) 1 (0%) 9 (2%)
5.5 408 11 (3%) 48 (12%) 14 (3%) 10 (2%)
5.6 87 12 (14%) 6 (7%) 5 (6%) 2 (2%)
5.7 232 30 (13%) 32 (14%) 5 (2%) 2 (1%)

This cycle has been good for reviews/acks, scoring second highest percentage ever on both, as well as being right up there on absolute numbers.

Developers with the most changesets

Developer # %
Benjamin Herrenschmidt 41 (17.7%)
Stewart Smith 31 (13.4%)
Michael Neuling 28 (12.1%)
Oliver O’Halloran 18 (7.8%)
Vasant Hegde 18 (7.8%)
Jeremy Kerr 12 (5.2%)
Alistair Popple 11 (4.7%)
Gavin Shan 10 (4.3%)
Russell Currey 9 (3.9%)
Michael Ellerman 9 (3.9%)
Madhavan Srinivasan 7 (3.0%)
Cyril Bur 6 (2.6%)
Christophe Lombard 5 (2.2%)
Shilpasri G Bhat 5 (2.2%)
Andrew Donnellan 3 (1.3%)
Nicholas Piggin 3 (1.3%)
Mahesh Salgaonkar 2 (0.9%)
Anju T Sudhakar 2 (0.9%)
Hemant Kumar 2 (0.9%)
Matt Brown 1 (0.4%)
Michael Tritz 1 (0.4%)
Joel Stanley 1 (0.4%)
Balbir Singh 1 (0.4%)
Frederic Barrat 1 (0.4%)
Andrew Jeffery 1 (0.4%)
Pridhiviraj Paidipeddi 1 (0.4%)
Reza Arbab 1 (0.4%)
Suraj Jitindar Singh 1 (0.4%)
Vaibhav Jain 1 (0.4%)

Developers with the most changed lines

Developer # %
Hemant Kumar 3056 (23.0%)
Stewart Smith 1826 (13.7%)
Benjamin Herrenschmidt 1348 (10.1%)
Christophe Lombard 937 (7.0%)
Shilpasri G Bhat 770 (5.8%)
Madhavan Srinivasan 755 (5.7%)
Jeremy Kerr 731 (5.5%)
Cyril Bur 674 (5.1%)
Alistair Popple 477 (3.6%)
Gavin Shan 414 (3.1%)
Russell Currey 396 (3.0%)
Michael Neuling 336 (2.5%)
Vasant Hegde 308 (2.3%)
Oliver O’Halloran 300 (2.3%)
Anju T Sudhakar 300 (2.3%)
Michael Tritz 167 (1.3%)
Frederic Barrat 113 (0.8%)
Nicholas Piggin 93 (0.7%)
Mahesh Salgaonkar 76 (0.6%)
Michael Ellerman 66 (0.5%)
Suraj Jitindar Singh 59 (0.4%)
Andrew Donnellan 53 (0.4%)
Joel Stanley 20 (0.2%)
Balbir Singh 12 (0.1%)
Reza Arbab 10 (0.1%)
Vaibhav Jain 9 (0.1%)
Pridhiviraj Paidipeddi 2 (0.0%)
Matt Brown 1 (0.0%)
Andrew Jeffery 1 (0.0%)

Developers with the most signoffs

(total 242)

Developer # %
Stewart Smith 201 (83.1%)
Michael Neuling 29 (12.0%)
Madhavan Srinivasan 4 (1.7%)
Suraj Jitindar Singh 3 (1.2%)
Anju T Sudhakar 2 (0.8%)
Hemant Kumar 2 (0.8%)
Cyril Bur 1 (0.4%)

Developers with the most reviews

(total 32)

Developer # %
Vasant Hegde 8 (25.0%)
Cyril Bur 7 (21.9%)
Andrew Donnellan 5 (15.6%)
Frederic Barrat 5 (15.6%)
Andrew Jeffery 2 (6.2%)
Gavin Shan 2 (6.2%)
Joel Stanley 1 (3.1%)
Oliver O’Halloran 1 (3.1%)
Alistair Popple 1 (3.1%)

Developers with the most test credits

(total 5)

Developer # %
Vasant Hegde 2 (40.0%)
Oliver O’Halloran 1 (20.0%)
Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli 1 (20.0%)
Michael Ellerman 1 (20.0%)

Developers who gave the most tested-by credits

(total 5)

Developer # %
Jeremy Kerr 2 (40.0%)
Vasant Hegde 1 (20.0%)
Oliver O’Halloran 1 (20.0%)
Michael Ellerman 1 (20.0%)

Developers with the most report credits

(total 2)

Developer # %
Oliver O’Halloran 1 (50.0%)
Alastair D’Silva 1 (50.0%)

Developers who gave the most report credits

(total 2)

Developer # %
Andrew Donnellan 1 (50.0%)
Stewart Smith 1 (50.0%)